Cowlitz Country News - Archives - Okanagan
  On-line since 2011 - Updated February 29, 2011
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February 2012

Okanagan: Sharing aboriginal dance traditions in the Shuswap - On Monday Feb. 20, a group of young aboriginal dancers from Vernon were accompanied by the band Little Hawk, at a performance in the gymnasium at Carlin Elementary Middle School. The session was narrated by Okanagan Indian Band elder Emery Robins, and presented to two separate groups of students, one for elementary students, followed by another performance for middle school students.

Okanagan: A spirituality nourished by nature - First Nations people see no difference between their spirituality and their culture. "For us, as the first people of this land, spirituality is both very simple and very complex. There is a Creator and we were created to live here in harmony with the land. We have always been here, connected to the land and all the other creatures that live on the land. The land provided for us and we cared for the land," said Mollie Bono, Okanagan Indian Band representative to the Inter-Faith Bridging project.


December 2011

Okanagan: Traditional winter house explained - As supervisor of the Okanagan Indian Bandís kekuli house at Komasket Park, Eric Mitchell is on a mission to explain the correct use of the word. "If you read about our traditional winter house, youíll read about the word kekuli," said Mitchell, a band member. "There was a traditional language our people used when we went to the Coast, called Chinook Jargon, and kekuli actually means something underneath, so people know what you mean, but the proper term should be kekuli house or in English it would be a pit house."

 
 
 
 


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Rod Van Mechelen, Publisher & Editor, Cowlitz Country News

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